Stoneware

What is Stoneware?

Stoneware is a high- fired ceramic that is vitreous or semi-vitreous, not translucent, and often made of clays that are not highly refined. Stonewares commonly have some speck and some particulate material such as sand or fine grog. It is harder than earthenware, and fired at a kiln temperature of about 1200 –1300°C. Its colour is usually grey, buff, white or brown, but terra cotta colour was also made. Stoneware is strong and can hold water, though is not completely waterproof unless glazed

Stoneware

Case Study: C20th Studio Pottery Bowl

Cleaning was undertaken with a weak solution of a non-ionic detergent in deionised water followed by the controlled use of a Derotor Steam Cleaner GV. The fragment was bonded using a 1:1 solution of an acrylic resin in acetone. The missing area was reconstructed with an epoxy paste made from water-white epoxy resin, fumed silica and artist’s dry powder pigments. The filled area was retouched using a water-borne ceramic glaze and artist’s dry powder pigments.

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Case Study: Lucie Rie Vase

(Private Collection)

The vase had previously been repaired; the repairs were deteriorating and unsightly.
The repairs were reversed mechanically and then with solvent application. The object was further cleaned mechanically and with the controlled use of a Derotor Steam Cleaner GV. The fragments were bonded with a water-white epoxy resin. The missing area was then reconstructed with an epoxy colour fill; epoxy resin, plus fumed silica and artist’s dry powder pigments. The fill was refined using sanding fabric and it was further retouched with a quick drying water borne ceramic glaze and artist’s dry powder pigments. Finally, the fill was finished with a plastic polish.

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